Black History Martin Luther King Jr Essay

The day Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, Robert F. Kennedy was campaigning for the presidency in Indianapolis, Indiana. Kennedy made this speech in remembrance of Dr. King's tireless efforts.

I have bad news for you, for all of our fellow citizens, and people who love peace all over the world, and that is that Martin Luther King was shot and killed tonight.

Martin Luther King dedicated his life to love and to justice for his fellow human beings, and he died because of that effort.

In this difficult day, in this difficult time for the United States, it is perhaps well to ask what kind of a nation we are and what direction we want to move in. For those of you who are black — considering the evidence there evidently is that there were white people who were responsible — you can be filled with bitterness, with hatred, and a desire for revenge. We can move in that direction as a country, in great polarization — black people amongst black, white people amongst white, filled with hatred toward one another.

Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand and to comprehend, and to replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand with compassion and love.

For those of you who are black and are tempted to be filled with hatred and distrust at the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I can only say that I feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling. I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man. But we have to make an effort in the United States, we have to make an effort to understand, to go beyond these rather difficult times.

My favorite poet was Aeschylus. He wrote: "In our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God."

What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence or lawlessness; but love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or they be black.

So I shall ask you tonight to return home, to say a prayer for the family of Martin Luther King, that's true, but more importantly to say a prayer for our own country, which all of us love — a prayer for understanding and that compassion of which I spoke.

We can do well in this country. We will have difficult times; we've had difficult times in the past; we will have difficult times in the future. It is not the end of violence; it is not the end of lawlessness; it is not the end of disorder.

But the vast majority of white people and the vast majority of black people in this country want to live together, want to improve the quality of our life, and want justice for all human beings who abide in our land.

Let us dedicate to ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world.

Let us dedicate ourselves to that, and say a prayer for our country and for our people.

Dr. Martin Luther King Is An Important Figure Of Black History,

Dr. Martin Luther King is an important figure of black history, he was the winner of the Nobel peace prize in 1964, and he wrote one of the most important speeches in history called "I have a dream". This speech was given on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. Dr. King, using religious language and "the Gettysburg Address" of Lincoln, is trying to stop all the racial injustices that were happening in those years over the color race. I think that this speech is pretty well written, it has a lot of good things to talk about and I think that Dr. King did good job writing and showing the people what he thought.

Dr. King opens his speech referring to one of the most important figures that the American History has, Abraham Lincoln. King using him as symbol of liberty said "five scores years ago" Lincoln signed this valuable paper in which decree that all the Negros have Freedom, this day was one the most important days of black history. One hundred years later, according to King, the Negro was still not frees. The Negro still lives in poverty, segregated by the population. King tells us how the Negros were expecting freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, but one hundred years later the Negros were still not free, they were still living in the same or worst conditions that they were living one hundred years before.

Dr. King next points out that they have come to the nation's Capital to cash a check. He said that the persons who wrote the beautiful words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence were signing a promise; a promise which all the America's sons have the same rights, the same liberty, and the same right to reach happiness, but it is obvious that America has defaulted the promises concerning the color race. Instead America has given the Negro a bad check which has a marked on the back saying "insufficient funds". According to King they refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. They refuse to believe that there is no hope for the Negro people in this country, in this nation. That's why they have come to this sacred spot to cash a check, a check which is going to liberate the Negro for all repressions and that is going to make the Negro think that there is still hope and justice in this country.

Dr. King next points out; "1963 is not an end, but is just a beginning" because all the revolts will continue to shake until the light of the sun rises for the black people as well. King said that it would be fatal for the nation if they just look over these problems and not pay attention to it.

King also talked to his people saying that while the process takes place they need to be calm, they don't need to be aggressive to other people; King said "in the process of gaining our right place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds". They have to conduct their...

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