Canadian Style Cv Cover Letter

  • Moving2Canada readers get their first international money transfer free with CurrencyFair.

16 tips to adapt to the resume format in Canada

1. Your resume is a tool to secure an interview. It’s not intended to be a thorough work history document. When you write a resume for Canada, concentrate on presenting the reader your highlights, not every detail. The interview is the time to go into detail.

2. Keep your resume interesting. Typically, hiring managers will only spend 10-30 seconds browsing your document. Use the resume format in Canada to sell yourself in a concise way that focuses on your achievements.

3. Use a professional resume template. Register for a Moving2Canada account to get a professional resume template sent to your email for free.

4. Avoid long paragraphs and small fonts (less than size 10 is not a good idea). Use an easily readable font and make sure that only one font is used throughout. Ensure your resume format style is consistent.

5. Do not use the first person (e.g. “I am technical”, “I worked at XYZ”). Use short sentences (e.g. “Increased sales by 10%”).

6. The resume format in Canada means your document should typically be a maximum of two pages. If you do not have a lot of experience, then one page should suffice. If you have 10+ years of experience, then three pages is acceptable.

7. Don’t waste valuable space. Only list experience relevant for the role to which you are applying.

8. Convert all terms to the Canadian equivalent. For example, use terms like “high school”, “GPA” (Grade Point Average — the equivalent for university grades), “internship”, etc.

9. Do not list personal interests or hobbies unless they are achievements that add to your character. Remember: a good resume sets you apart from other candidates. Mentioning that you like rugby, play piano, and enjoy the cinema, is not likely to boost your chances of success.

10. Include skills, such as being able to speak a second language, or mastery of particular computer applications. Ensure you only include those that are relevant to the job you’re applying for.

11. Avoid sending a generic resume to dozens of employers. Your time is better spent being selective, and tailoring your resume for each specific job and company you’re applying to.

12. Use a nice resume format, and where possible, have it proofread by an expert in the field. Grammatical and spelling errors on a resume can harm your first impression. Find out how Moving2Canada can help you improve your resume.

13. Do not list that you are on a “gap year” or “one-year work permit”. Companies want to employ committed candidates who are going to contribute to their success. In an interview, you can discuss your immigration status if the employer requests more information. If you are in Canada on a temporary permit, research longer-term permanent residency options so you can discuss ways of potentially staying in Canada once your work permit expires.

14. Do not include the word ‘resume’ or ‘CV’ at the top of the page, or the date you prepared the document.

15. Do not sign your resume.

16. Do not list references, or include the line ‘references available on request’. It will be assumed that you have these ready, so don’t waste valuable space on your resume by stating this. Have references’ names and contact details ready to present when requested, and make sure they’re willing to speak on your behalf.

Preparing for the resume format in Canada

Here’s some useful advice to help you craft the contact, career summary, and work history sections of your resume.

Contact Information

  • Do not list your date of birth, gender, marital status, or parents’ names. It’s not required under the employment law in Canada, and is not a necessary part of the resume format in Canada.
  • Where possible, ensure you have a Canadian address listed. More importantly, include a Canadian cell phone number.
  • Ensure that you have an e-mail address that looks professional. It should include a combination of your first name and last name, and avoid slang terms or nicknames. Avoid using emails with foreign domains, like .co.uk, or .co.in. If necessary, set up a new e-mail address for your job hunt.
  • Add your LinkedIn profile URL. Create a custom LinkedIn profile URL so that it isn’t as ‘clunky’ as the one that LinkedIn designated for you. You want to make it as easy as possible for the employer to find your profile, particularly when viewing a printed version. Also, ensure it’s up to date and that your profile contains a strong summary.

Professional / career summary

This is a micro resume that will allow the reader to understand what your goals are and how you can help their company.

Three or four short sentences will suffice to set the tone for the detail that follows. Outline what makes you different, whether it is personality, technical ability, managerial skills, team building, or some other talents.

Begin by stating your objective clearly. You should list the title of the role you want to target – if you’re responding to a job posting, this role will be the job you’re applying for. Being a jack of all trades is not a good thing for an employer. If you want to be a Project Manager, then call yourself a Project Manager. Don’t expect a company to identify what you should be.

If you would like to do two or three different things, then build two or three specific documents, and follow the resume format in Canada in each. Listing “Marketing / Admin / Finance Professional” is not attractive, so have a clear focus for the relevant job application.

  • Mention how many years of relevant experience you have, what type of experience this is, and your future ambitions.
  • Avoid generic comments (e.g. “honest and hardworking professional”). Instead, give the reader a true insight into your strengths and objectives (e.g. “able to continually identify cost savings and efficiencies, and routinely trusted to manage projects effectively, mentor junior colleagues, and solve problems”). These should be specific to you, and not things that anyone can write on their resume.
  • Mention your career aspirations, whether this is professional designations, supervisory work, managerial work, or other work.

Continued below...

How do you write a cover letter? Don’t worry, we will provide tips on how to write a focused cover letter and supply you with cover letter examples.

A cover letter is expected for all professional job applications and is crucial to finding jobs in Canada. In some instances — such as if you are lucky enough to be referred by an employee of a company — a cover letter may not be completely necessary, but it is best to write a targeted cover letter for each job application as it is a means of demonstrating your understanding of the position and how your skills and experience match the requirements.

Don’t forget to download the Moving2Canada Getting Started Success Program today. We’ve packaged templates for a Canadian-style resume and a cover letter with this download. The guide will give you exclusive access to our proven techniques for accelerating your job search in Canada. It’s a free comprehensive guide aimed at making your move a success.

 

Important: Before you begin writing your cover letter, think about this scenario.

Boy likes girl, plucks up the courage to ask her out as he knows her through a common friend. He turns up to the date and talks about himself for most of the time.

Do you think the girl wants to see him again? Not likely. Instead of talking about himself he could have researched the girl’s interests through a common friend and then created conversation on topics that are of interest to the girl.

Applying for a job is the same. We see lots of cover letters and people simply talk incessantly about themselves, which is a turn off to anyone.

Why do this when you want to impress an employer? Put bluntly, the company only cares about solving its business problems and not about your academic records and your “strong work ethic and reliability”.

Take the time to understand the company and talk about how you can help them. That’s how to make a strong first impression and write a successful cover letter.

Generic cover letters that state “I have always wanted to work for {insert company name} . . .” don’t cut it, so differentiate yourself by showing the company you are genuinely interested in them.

Write a Cover Letter:

  • Always attach a cover letter that states your relevant skills and reasons why you are right for the role in question. A cover letter is not all about you. Ensure you spend at least 30 per cent of the document talking about what you know about the company — recent projects, company values, company news. Make the company feel special and they will want to invite you for an interview.
  • Do not repeat all the information from your resume. Focus on showing your potential employers why the skills and experience you have would be a fit for the role in question. Many people tend to list their resume in long paragraphs, but this will not suffice. Zero in on discussing how your skills and experience are suitable to meet each of the specified job requirements. It makes sense to address each requirement in turn, then the company know that you understand the requirements and feel that you meet these requirements.
  • Do your research on the company and demonstrate this in your cover letter to ensure you make a good first impression.
  • Reminder: The two documents — resume and cover letter — need to complement each other, so keep your resume brief and then write a cover letter to pad around the key skills and attributes that the role demands. Ensure you “tick all the boxes” that are outlined in the job description.

0 thoughts on “Canadian Style Cv Cover Letter”

    -->

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *